How Should I Vote? (Part 2)

March 7, 2000

With the primary elections just a week away, I wanted to pass on some principles you should consider before you cast your vote. Yesterday I began by listing three important principles. Here is another one.

Donít let the best get in the way of the good. In an ideal world we would like to vote for a candidate with great moral character who agrees with us on all of the issues. Often in political life, as well as in other areas of life, we must make a choice that does not include the best. When we go out to buy a car, often we canít find the ideal car, so we settle on the one that includes as many of the options we desire and can afford. Likewise, we might not find the best candidate and have to settle for a good candidate to elect.

Let me use a personal example. My fatherís days in politics are coming to an end. But letís assume that he was going to make one more run for the California Assembly. My father isnít as strongly pro-life as I might like since he would allow abortions for a number of exceptions. However, his opponent would no doubt be 100% pro-choice and receive backing from NARAL and Planned Parenthood.

If a bill to ban partial-birth abortions came before the legislature, he would vote for it, and his opponent would vote against it. If a bill to ban third trimester abortions came before the legislature, he would vote for it, and his opponent would vote against it. So there really is a choice, and I believe we should choose the better candidate. More about that tomorrow.

Iím Kerby Anderson of Probe Ministries, and thatís my opinion.